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Iceberg

Iceberg

Iceberg A68 broke away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica July, 2017. Since then maps have had to be redrawn of the peninsula. As A68 slowly makes its way into open waters, scientists are carefully charting its movements. It is one of the largest Icebergs ever recorded. Gianna Stewart’s Iceberg was placed in the Fort Point Channel fall 2017 in response to these current events. The installation remained on view through April 2018. The fictitious bergy bits were an ode to A68 and our changing world.

Iceberg, an FPAC Floating Public Art project, was funded by the Fort Point Channel Operations Board.

photo credit: Robert Gilliam

Iceberg

Iceberg

Iceberg

Gianna Stewart

Materials: EPS foam, boat resin, uv pigment, pvc, marine hardware

Scale: approximately 17’ x 13’ x 9’ and 15’ x 5’ x 5’

photo credit: Robert Gilliam

Iceberg

Iceberg

The fictitious Iceberg was an ode to Iceberg A68 and our changing world.

Iceberg

Iceberg

Iceberg A68 broke away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica July, 2017. Since then maps have had to be redrawn of the peninsula. As A68 slowly makes its way into open waters, scientists are carefully charting its movements. It is one of the largest Icebergs ever recorded. Gianna Stewart’s Iceberg was placed in the Fort Point Channel fall 2017 in response to these current events. The installation remained on view through April 2018.

Iceberg

Iceberg

Iceberg by Gianna Stewart remained on view through April 2018.

It was an ode to our changing world.

Iceberg, an FPAC Floating Public Art project, was funded by the Fort Point Channel Operations Board.

Materials:

EPS foam, boat resin, uv pigment, pvc, marine hardware

Scale:

approximately 17’ x 13’ x 9’ and 15’ x 5’ x 5’

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Special Thanks to:

Michael DeKoster, Boston Rowing Center

Emily O’Neil, Fort Point Arts Community

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Assistants:

Michael Talbot

Tori Reimann

Ulana Ainsworth

Robert Gilliam

Jenny D

Ariel Grubb

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Ed McCabe, Boston Rowing Center

Don Eyles

Denise Bosco

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Magical Amass

Magical Amass

Bonnaroo creates a city of travelers from all over, meeting for a moment under a common love of music and people. Many stay in tents, each unique, each all the shelter one needs for the festival.

In Magical Amass translucent tents shimmer in the sunlight, amassing into the form of one large tent.

Magical Amass

Magical Amass

The suspended sculpture’s form echoes the opening of the skylight. The cast plastic tents have a glass-like appearance, each with a slightly different hue. Their subtle differences amass into a greater gesture overhead as one passes through the airport. Much like the experience of becoming part of the bigger vibe at Bonnaroo, each tent is made greater as part of a larger whole.

Magical Amass

Magical Amass

Detail: Magical Amass

122 cast plastic tents, each with a slightly different hue amass into the shape of a larger tent overhead.

Magical Amass was one of five 2017 skylight installations on view in the Nashville International Airport made possible by Arts at the Airport, and the Bonnaroo Works Fund.

Photography:

Bruce Cain, Elevated Lens Photography

Arts Administrator:

Mary Grissim, Curator, Arts at the Airport

Install Team:

Duncan McDaniel & Art Up Nashville

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Special Thanks To:

Peter Hilton & Glenn Hilton

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 Midden: A pile of refuse, chiefly containing shells  When The Big Dig was underway in Boston, several midden were unearthed. The ancient trash heaps revealed much about those who roamed these sites before us. Often the shells grew larger towards the bottom of the piles, artifacts from before oysters were harvested as abundantly. Left alone, an oyster never stops growing.

Midden: A pile of refuse, chiefly containing shells

When The Big Dig was underway in Boston, several midden were unearthed. The ancient trash heaps revealed much about those who roamed these sites before us. Often the shells grew larger towards the bottom of the piles, artifacts from before oysters were harvested as abundantly. Left alone, an oyster never stops growing.

Midden

Midden

These dozen oysters of mythical proportions beg the question- what will we leave behind?

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Midden

Midden

Special Thanks To:

Greenway Public Art Curator:

Lucas Cowan

Greenway Staff Especially:

Melissa Henry, Curatorial Assistant

Tom Ball, Maintenance Foreman

Volunteers:

Ulana Ainsworth

Audrina Bell Warren

Victoria Reimann

Matt Shropshire

Christine Banna

Christina Stewart

Peter Hilton

Glenn Hilton

Metal Bases:

Dan Kendall, Sincere Metal Works

Material Consult:

Caroline Politi, Reynolds Advanced Materials

Photography by:

Christine Banna

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 Oysters are the water’s natural filters. Here,  Midden  rests below the air intake shaft for the I-93 tunnel below, pulsing colored light, as if breathing, as the wave of night passes over them.

Oysters are the water’s natural filters. Here, Midden rests below the air intake shaft for the I-93 tunnel below, pulsing colored light, as if breathing, as the wave of night passes over them.

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Toll With Me

Toll With Me

Each bell hangs from a single jump in the opening of a chain link fence. 

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Toll With Me

Toll With Me

Toll With Me is comprised of 8,500 bells. They hang in an undulating form along nearly 100ft of fence on A Street in Fort Point, Boston. Their light sound is activated by the wind or the trailing hand of a passerby.

Gianna Stewart. 2015.

Toll With Me was made possible by FPAC Spring Open Studios and generous support from a grant from The South Boston Community Development Foundation.

For more on the Fort Point Arts Community visit: http://www.fortpointarts.org

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Toll With Me

Toll With Me

Toll With Me was installed May 2015 for FPAC Spring Open Studios. The community was invited to help hang bells throughout installation and Open Studios.

Toll With Me

Toll With Me

Special thank you to bell hangers:

Sue Johnson

Amy Heavisides

Julie Weaver

Tosh Yashiro

Peter Hilton

Toll With Me was made possible by FPAC Spring Open Studios and generous support from a grant from The South Boston Community Development Foundation. For more on the Fort Point Arts Community visit: http://www.fortpointarts.org

Toll With Me

Toll With Me is comprised of 8,500 bells. They hang in an undulating form along nearly 100ft of fence on A Street in Fort Point, Boston. Their light sound is activated by the wind or the trailing hand of a passerby.

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Toll With Me

Toll With Me

 

 

 

 

Gianna Stewart. 2015

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Capturing The Sunrise

Capturing The Sunrise

Capturing The Sunrise. Video Still. Limited Edition Print. 2015 

 

Capturing The Sunrise

Capturing The Sunrise

Capturing The Sunrise was a video installation for 8Nights8Windows. For eights nights, just after sunset, sunrises were projected onto the window of Cambridge Trust Company, Tremont Street, Boston. 

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 As the sun rose, the horizon slowly spun clockwise. 

As the sun rose, the horizon slowly spun clockwise. 

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